History

This video was generously created by volunteers Gaelen Sayres and David Helberg / Regression Studios.

NAMASTE CHILDREN'S FUND STORY

Can a Photograph Change Lives?


In 2000, Seattle photographer Cora Edmonds encountered a young child while traveling in the remote Humla region of western Nepal. The image of a boy with his palms together in the traditional Namaste gesture of greeting and respect had a dramatic impact on her life.

The photograph became an instant hit with audiences at ArtXchange Gallery. Phil Crean saw the photograph in a Seattle exhibit and felt compelled to meet Cora. They married several years later. Spurred on by their strong intuitive connection with the child in the photograph, Phil and Cora returned to Nepal in 2007 to search for the child. Their quest was successful and they found the boy, Gyeni Bohara, living in a village called Thehe in the Humla region.

Touched by the wisdom of the culture yet unable to forget the hardship and poverty they witnessed in Thehe, Cora and Phil established the Namaste Children’s Fund in 2008, a non-profit organization to help impoverished rural children and their communities in Nepal.

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